Posts made in January, 2017

Turk Westerling and the Prince Justice Legion

Posted by on Jan 4, 2017 in Uncategorized | 2 comments

Turk Westerling and the Prince Justice Legion

Between December 1946 and February 1947, Dutch “Red Beret” Special Forces Captain Raymond “Turk” Westerling led a brutal campaign to eradicate anti-colonial resistance in South Sulawesi. Westerling’s father was a Dutch antique dealer in Istanbul. His mother was Greek. He volunteered for duty with British-Dutch forces during the Second World War and joined the elite commando force. In Britain, he married a local woman. During October 1944, Sergeant Westerling was dropped behind enemy lines in the Netherlands to help organize a resistance movement. Badly injured by a German V-1 rocket explosion in March 1945, he spent the remainder of the war in a British hospital. In June 1945, he received a commission as a reserve second lieutenant in the Dutch Colonial Army and was deployed to Admiral Mountbatten’s Ceylon Headquarters. After the Japanese surrender, Turk Westerling parachuted into North Sumatra in mid-September 1945 as part of an eight-man Recovery of Allied Prisoners of War and Internees (RAPWI) team under Dutch Navy Lieutenant Commander C.A.M. Brondgeest. Drawing upon his covert guerilla war training with the Special Forces, he organized an ad hoc Military Police force, actually more of an armed gang, drawing principally on Ambonese and Manadonese former Colonial Army and police members and pro-Dutch Indo-Europeans. Westerling’s group provided bodyguards to protect Dutch, Europeans, Chinese, pro-Dutch Ambonese and Indonesians from nationalist zealots. He and his men conducted nighttime raids to kill or capture “criminals” – mostly nationalists and communists who opposed restoring Dutch rule. On more than one occasion, they placed their victims’ heads on stakes as a warning to others. Officers in the British Allied contingent were unhappy with the Westerling gang’s uncoordinated, brutal vigilante-style justice (although it apparently met with approval from Brondgeest and the Dutch High Command). In one anecdote, Westerling shocked a visiting British officer by pulling the head of a wanted man from the wastebasket in his office. Between December 1946 and February 1947, Dutch “Red Beret” Special Forces Captain Raymond “Turk” Westerling led a brutal campaign to eradicate anti-colonial resistance in South Sulawesi. Westerling’s father was a Dutch antique dealer in Istanbul. His mother was Greek. He volunteered for duty with British-Dutch forces during the Second World War and joined the elite commando force. In Britain, he married a local woman. During October 1944, Sergeant Westerling was dropped behind enemy lines in the Netherlands to help organize a resistance movement. Badly injured by a German V-1 rocket explosion in March 1945, he spent the remainder of the war in a British hospital. In June 1945, he received a commission as a reserve second lieutenant in the Dutch Colonial Army and was deployed to Admiral Mountbatten’s Ceylon Headquarters. After the Japanese surrender, Turk Westerling parachuted into North Sumatra in mid-September 1945 as part of an eight-man Recovery of Allied Prisoners of War and Internees (RAPWI) team under Dutch Navy Lieutenant Commander C.A.M. Brondgeest. Drawing upon his covert guerilla war training with the Special Forces, he organized an ad hoc Military Police force, actually more of an armed gang, drawing principally on Ambonese and Manadonese former Colonial Army and police members and pro-Dutch Indo-Europeans. Westerling’s group...

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